pre-raphaelisme:

In Time of Peril by Edmund Blair Leighton, 1897.

pre-raphaelisme:

In Time of Peril by Edmund Blair Leighton, 1897.

hushandwonder:

I threw a genderbent Jack Ryan (Bioshock) cosplay together and Sofia and I took some pictures around Chicago. We’ll probably do some really fun bloody/scary ones at a later date, but for now here’s Jack(ie) getting ready to board her flight and a couple of her in Rapture.

Bonus photo of me licking the wrench to show what a mature and beautiful person I am. 

(출처: wolverxne)

likeafieldmouse:

Sleeping Beasts, by Dara Scully

likeafieldmouse:

Sleeping Beasts, by Dara Scully

nondesignated:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock

Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Website // Tumblr // Twitter

harbingerkins:

Wobbuffet Appreciation

cinyma:

The making of Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
One part of me, upon looking at this painting, immediately thinks: “never ever let your children sleep on the art.”
But the soldiers in the far background (on the left) will probably do worse, so I guess that’s down in the noise.
Bonhams tells us that Sir John Everett Millais “used operatic plots…for the subjects of some of his minutely detailed Pre-Raphaelite paintings of the 1850s:…[he based his 1855 painting] L’Enfant du Régiment on Donizetti’s La Figlia del Reggimento.”
About an infant raised by the regiment of soldiers who found her, La Figlia del Reggimento certainly resembles its descendent.
In Millais’ version, the poor dear thing appears to have injured her arm.
(Serves her right, for sleeping on the art.)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

One part of me, upon looking at this painting, immediately thinks: “never ever let your children sleep on the art.”

But the soldiers in the far background (on the left) will probably do worse, so I guess that’s down in the noise.

Bonhams tells us that Sir John Everett Millais “used operatic plots…for the subjects of some of his minutely detailed Pre-Raphaelite paintings of the 1850s:…[he based his 1855 painting] L’Enfant du Régiment on Donizetti’s La Figlia del Reggimento.”

About an infant raised by the regiment of soldiers who found her, La Figlia del Reggimento certainly resembles its descendent.

In Millais’ version, the poor dear thing appears to have injured her arm.

(Serves her right, for sleeping on the art.)